Sunday, March 13, 2011

The Aftermath.

The situation in Japan is so unreal, and somehow this nightmare just won't end. I still feel so lucky and safe in Osaka, but my heart goes to Sendai, and everyone who has family and friends up north. My thoughts go to my friends in Tokyo and north of Tokyo, who still feel shakes every twenty minutes and cannot get any sleep. To my friend who had to spend the last few days in a shelter because his apartment was damaged, and another who was alone when it all took place near her city. And to those who suffered from loss. This kind of incident can make you feel so isolated and helpless, yet so close.

Japanese people remain so strong and calm during this chaos. They believe in the ganbare がんばれ attitude: "Let's hang in there", or "Try our best". Life went on as usual this weekend- at least in appearance. There is no sense of panic here, even though I know it's heavily on each person's mind.

I have never been so close (yet so far) to this kind of natural disaster before in my life, and it's very unsettling. I hope it ends soon, and I pray it does not get worse. I'm ever so thankful to be where I am now, and thank you for all your kind words and thoughts.

For now, helping out is the only thing to do. Most convenience stores have donation boxes, and my school started gathering other donations such a clothing items. We're also encouraged to not use unnecessary electricity, as there are blackouts everywhere north of Tokyo.

がんばれ, Japan. xo

10 comments:

thevoyageofv said...

I can't even imagine what it must feel like in Japan right now. And while my heart aches for the many who were directly effected by this disaster, I'm so, so relieved you're alright. Hang in there.

French Lover said...

Le reste du monde pense à vous. Difficile de ne pas se sentir complètement impuissant.. Hang in there & keep us posted <3

Corie said...

Glad to know that you're safe in Osaka. What an emotional whirlwind this time must be!

magdalena viktoria said...

My thoughts and prayers are with all the people experiencing a difficult time.
Glad to know you are okay
xx

Life Abroad said...

I'm so glad to hear that you are safe and that you were not near the damage. It has been so unbelievably awful seeing the images of what has been happening in Japan.

Jay Branam said...

I hate the thought of devadtion in such a beautiful country. Im keeping everyone in my prayers & hope u are good love

Michi said...

All of the raw footage coming in is so awful to watch. I'm again glad to hear you and your friends are okay. "Hang in there."

Tee, Passports and Postcards said...

I'm glad that you are safe. Seeing all the pictures of the damages is heartbreaking.

Tu-Anh said...

i hear tokyo is becoming a ghost town as people are leaving it every day. i'm glad you are okay and safe where you are.

i do have a question for you that i am sure you can give me insight on. I have an idea of why but a insider's perspective would be very enlightening. so there has been a lot of people outside of japan asking why there is no looting during the aftermath. we all know what happened in new orleans and haiti, but looting was so rampant. any answers as to why the culture of japan doesnt encourage looting?

http://www.google.co.uk/search?um=1&hl=en&biw=1472&bih=634&q=why+no+looting+japan&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=iw

Vivian said...

Tu-Anh-

Good question. I think simply because there is commonly no looting in Japanese culture. I'm not saying Japanese culture is free from crime (which is not), but in general people do not steal things. You could leave your wallet or handbag on a table at Starbucks in the middle of Shibuya, and no one would steal it- they'd run after you to return it. That is just how things are here, and I think it's an amazing thing, especially during those hard times.